Course Catalog

Posted on: January 4th, 2011 by Jennifer Boulanger

ART DEPARTMENT

The SWW Art Department offers courses in the art experience, drawing, pottery, fundamentals of film, visual arts seminar and photography techniques. The art department produces an annual video yearbook that can be viewed on cable 25. The visual arts are also integrated into the Humanities program with art history, museum trips and studio experiences. SWW students also participate in the National Art Honor Society, the Corcoran Art Membership Program, the Conserving Our Legacy contest, exhibit locally (Sumner Museum, Superior Court, and Representative Eleanor Holmes Norton’s office) and have received numerous awards and accolades for their accomplishments.

A05 Foundations of Art & Design — 0.5 credit

Foundations of Art and Design is designed to provide students with a variety of experiences in the visual arts that will promote success in life situations. Students will explore media, use of tools, techniques and processes leading to the development of an art portfolio. They will also develop skills in making critical judgments related to art and their environment. The course content is multicultural in scope and includes art appreciation, design, advertising, drawing, painting, crafts, printmaking, technology, and career awareness.

A09 Art I — 1.0 Credits

Designed to provide students with the tools needed to interpret and create the language of visual images and artifacts. The focus is on increasing knowledge, understanding and application in using media to create products, the structure and function of design, multicultural art history, aesthetics and critical assessment, and making connections. A variety of processes will be studied including design, drawing, painting, computer art, advertising art, printmaking, and career awareness leading to the development of a portfolio.

A67 AP Art History (offered through the Social Studies Department) — 1.0 CREDIT

Prepares the student of art history for college credit while in high school. It provides a foundation for enjoying, understanding, and judging a work of art. Various learning experiences will be used including slide literature, required reading from art history texts, museum visits, class discussion, and critiques.

A35 Drawing and Painting II — 1.0 CREDIT

This course provides expanded and in-depth drawing and painting experiences for serious art students. Designed to develop mastery in one or more of the media previously explored, culminating in the preparation of completed work for exhibition and a portfolio.

A42 Photography I — 0.5 CREDIT

Emphasizes basic elements of photography, including use of the camera, darkroom and printing procedures,  and techniques for photographing art work.

A45 Photography Techniques — 0.5 CREDIT

Introduces the basic techniques involved in making photographs. Students choose subjects from their environment for special classroom assignments.

A50 Video Production I — 0.5 CREDIT

Video Production I is an introductory film and video studio course in which students will focus on various aspects of movie and television production, including script writing and development, pre-production planning, lighting and set design, digital audio, camera and camcorder techniques, creation of video soundtracks, editing on the computer, titling, special effects and post-production techniques. Students will also learn the basics of broadcast communications and the criteria for analyzing technical and content quality. Media Literacy is an integral component of all of the class work.

Students will be divided into collaborative crews to produce some of the following types of digital video pieces: short narrative/dramatic, news package, editorial, public service announcement, animated, video art, educational or documentary video production.

Student will work with: Sony HDR, Sony and Panasonic mini-DV and Flip video cameras, Lowell Professional lighting kits, Sennheisser lavaliere mics, Adobe Premiere Pro, After Effects and Encore, iDVD and Garage Band software on Apple iMac and iBook computers. Students will also have the opportunity to work with digital photography and Adobe Photoshop and LiveType, as well as Celtx script writing software.

A52 Video Production II QVI — 0.5 CREDIT

Video Production II prepares students to communicate dramatic information, ideas and emotions in a cultural system through the making and producing of videos. This course includes further instruction in theory of video, video technology and equipment operation, video production, video directing, video editing, cinematographic art, video audio and video operations planning and management.

Students also become the team that produces SWW News. The course will prepare students for this demanding and rewarding production job by reinforcing research, interviewing and news writing skills in the context of experience as a reporter. The students will write short feature news pieces, create short and long documentaries, attend and conduct press conferences and cover breaking and ongoing news events. Media history, literacy, advocacy and laws will be covered. Students will improve their skills with video cameras, recorders and editing software.  Students will also gain experience through field trips to broadcast stations and conferences with professionals in the field of broadcast journalism and television production. College/university programs and majors are discussed and counseling provided.

A55 Visual Arts Seminar — 0.5 CREDIT

Visual Arts Seminar is a studio and museum based fine arts course in which students study major art movements, styles and artists in Western and non-Western cultures through the application of art techniques in a series of art exercises and creative art projects. Field trips to local museums and individual research will focus on aspects of art history, aesthetics, and art criticism. Students will develop individual and collaborative fine art projects including such media as drawing, video, painting, computer graphics, sculpture or photography for inclusion in a portfolio.

A67 AP Art History (offered through the Social Studies Department) — 1.0 CREDIT

Prepares the student of art history for college credit while in high school. It provides a foundation for enjoying, understanding, and judging a work of art. Various learning experiences will be used including slide literature, required reading from art history texts, museum visits, class discussion, and critiques.

A72 Contemporary Art History & Studio 0.5 CREDIT

Students will analyze the characteristics and historical significance of painting and sculpture from the following artistic styles: Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Pointillism, Fauvism, Symbolism, Dada, Cubism, Contructivisim, De Stijl, Surrealism, the Harlem Renaissance, Abstract Expessionism, Pop Art, Op ARt, Minimalism, the Washington Color School, Post-Modernism and other Twentieth Century movements. They will produce original artwork inspired by and/or related to these styles.

A83 COMPUTER GRAPHICS .5 CREDIT (DCPS art credit for SWW only)

Computer Graphics is an introductory course into the use of digital photography, the Internet and computer graphics in design projects.  Students will learn the fundamental elements common to all visual art including composition, placement, color theory and typography through the use of peer critique.

The course uses the industry standard, Adobe Photoshop CS software. Projects will also include the use of digital photography, Adobe InDesign, as well as integrated and hands on techniques. Topics include importing photos from digital cameras and scanners, using paint tools for the creation of original artwork, enhancing digital images, creating typography, adding custom effects, color management, introductory/intermediate Photoshop techniques using the tool bar, layer palettes, applying gradients, filters and image adjustments. Students will incorporate graphic design elements and principles in such projects as logos, posters, ads, title design, product/packaging design, sculptural/architectural projects, fine art artist books and photo-collages.  Often projects are inspired by our daily changing interaction with contemporary media.

A85 Computer Graphics II — 0.5 Credit

Computer Graphics II is a second level course, following A84, Computer Graphics I. While being a second level course, with a necessary prerequisite, it is an introduction to the design, creation and maintenance of web pages and websites. Students learn how to critically evaluate website quality, learn how to create and maintain quality web pages, learn about web design standards and why they’re important, and learn to create and manipulate images. Media literacy will be studied. The course progresses from introductory work on web design to a culminating project in which students design and develop websites for local community and non-profit organizations. Students will also work on the SWWnews.com website.

Technically students will take their knowledge and skills in Photoshop, expand and then connect them to an introduction to Adobe Fireworks and Adobe Dreamweaver. Conceptually students will be expected to do research for examples of good and bad web design, search out visual/design inspiration from infinite sources and do research on design history and contemporary designers. This is an art class: creativity, innovation, exploration (both artistically and technically) and commitment to and pride in ones work are all essential for success in this course.

A91 Introduction to 3-Dimensional Design — 0.5 CREDIT (DCPS art credit for SWW only)

Introduction to 3-D Design covers the basics in media arts and sculpture with an understanding of design principles as they relate to depth, space and scale. Students will have the opportunity to study and explore a variety of materials, such as wire, plaster, found objects, glass and clay. We will work within a variety of methods: assemblage, installation and site specific installation, mixed media construction, incorporating time based media, subtractive carving, additive modeling, molding making and hot glass/hot metal casting. Approaches—representational, abstract and non-representational, new methods and materials in contemporary work, lost wax, geometric constructions, architectural models, metal/wood work, ceramics, industrial design,  furniture design,  relief sculpture and fiber arts—are some of the topics that will be studied through studio practice, field trips, art historical research and art criticism. Self-expression is always the goal of studio projects and critical/analytical writing.

The principles of design (balance, unity, emphasis, variety, contrasts, rhythm, repetition, proportion/scale and figure/ground relationship) will be studied as they relate to the visual elements of value, color, form/shape, line and texture.

Art Department Courses

The following courses meet DCPS art graduation requirement:

  • A05 Foundations of Art & Design .5 credit

Foundations of Art and Design is designed to provide students with a variety of experiences in the visual arts that will promote success in life situations. Students will explore media, use of tools, techniques and processes leading to the development of an art portfolio. They will also develop skills in making critical judgments related to art and their environment. The course content is multicultural in scope and includes art appreciation, design, advertising, drawing, painting, crafts, printmaking, technology and career awareness.

  • A83 COMPUTER GRAPHICS .5 CREDIT (DCPS art credit for SWW only)

Computer Graphics is an introductory course into the use of digital photography, the Internet and computer graphics in design projects. Students will learn the fundamental graphic design elements and principles common to all visual art including composition, placement, color theory and typography through the use of peer critique. The course covers the most important features of digital photography and computer graphics software including iPhoto, Adobe Photoshop, Painter and iWeb. Topics include importing photos from digital cameras and scanners, using paint tools for the creation of original artwork, enhancing digital images, typography, adding custom effects ,editing images and web pages for posting on the web, color management, and introductory Photoshop techniques. Students will incorporate graphic design elements and principles in such projects as logos, posters, ads, title design, product/packaging design, sculptural/architectural projects, fine art artist books and photo-collages.

  • A72 Contemporary Art History & Studio 0.5 CREDIT

Students will analyze the characteristics and historical significance of painting and sculpture from the following artistic styles: Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Pointillism, Fauvism, Symbolism, Dada, Cubism, Contructivisim, De Stijl, Surrealism, the Harlem Renaissance, Abstract Expessionism, Pop Art, Op ARt, Minimalism, the Washington Color School, Post-Modernism and other Twentieth Century movements. They will produce original artwork inspired by and/or related to these styles.

  • Introduction to 3-D Design 0.5 CREDIT (DCPS art credit for SWW only)

Introduction to 3-D Design covers the basics in media arts, sculpture, and ceramics with an understanding of design principles as they relate to depth and space. Students will have the opportunity to study and explore a variety of materials and methods such as: assemblage, collage work, plastercraft, fiber arts, jewelry, architectural models, installation art and mixed media construction with a major studio focus on ceramics Approaches such as figurative or nonfigurative sculpture, lost wax, geometric constructions, architectural models, metal/wood work, ceramics, industrial design, furniture, relief sculpture and fiber arts will be studied through studio practice, art historical research and art criticism

  • A55 Visual Arts Seminar 0.5 CREDIT

Visual Arts Seminar is a studio and museum based fine arts course in which students study major art movements, styles and artists in Western and non-Western cultures through the application of art techniques in a series of art exercises and creative art projects. Field trips to local museums and individual research will focus on aspects of art history, aesthetics, and art criticism. Students will develop individual and collaborative fine art projects including such media as drawing, video, painting, computer graphics, sculpture or photography for inclusion in a portfolio.


The following art courses do not meet DCPA graduation requirements. They may be taken for elective credit.

  • A50 Video I 0.5 CREDIT

An introductory film and video studio course in which students will focus on various aspects of movie and television production including scripting and pre-production planning, lighting and set design, digital audio, camera and camcorder techniques, creation of video soundtracks, editing on the computer, titling, special effects and post-production techniques. Students will also learn the basics of broadcast communications and criteria for judging technical and content quality.

Students will be divided into crews for the creation of a collaborative short narrative, news, editorial, public service announcement, animated, videoart, educational or documentary video production.

  • E45 Yearbook 0.5 CREDIT

 

E45 Yearbook — 0.5 CREDIT

Yearbook is an introductory course in graphic design computer applications in visual communication through design with the main purpose of creating a hardbound full color school yearbook.  In preparation for this task students will learn the essential skills for creating and using text, and graphic images in such areas as creating visual identities, marketing and selling products, information design, signage, typography and visually enhancing messages in publications and mass communications media. Students will learn key concepts in the elements and principles of design as they pertain to creating and evaluating artwork and layouts for publication. We will look at design history, starting with the Dada movement to the present day. We will explore innovations, stylistic departures, trends and traditions. Media literacy is an essential part of the course.

Using iMac computers, scanners and digital cameras, students will learn the basic concepts of professional design and photo imaging software, Adobe CS, to create and layout design projects.  Students will learn about careers in graphic design along with the fundamental elements and principles of design working with composition, placement, color theory and typography.

Innovation, creativity, responsibility, pride in your work, buy-in to group decisions, commitment to the success of a large scale group project and fearlessness about learning new software are all essential for succeeding in this class.

Theatre Arts

Acting (full-year class)                             1.0 CREDIT

Set Design (semester class)                     0.5 CREDIT

Costume Design (semester class)            0.5 CREDIT

Playwriting (semester class)                    0.5 CREDIT

Career/Vocational Education Department

  • V02 Computer Applications I 0.5 CREDIT

Focuses on the study and use of computer software including word processing, database, spreadsheet, keyboarding, and graphics software packages. Students are expected to use the computer as a tool to complete other course work.

  • W16 INTERNSHIP (Juniors) 0.5 CREDIT

Provides career preparation within specific occupational areas through seminars and supervised on-the-job training experiences in cooperation with area businesses, industry, and government/community agencies. Students attend scheduled seminars and experience on-the-job training under actual working conditions.

  • W17 INTERNSHIP 2 (Seniors) 0.5 CREDIT

Provides career preparation within specific occupational areas through seminars and supervised on-the-job training experiences in cooperation with area businesses, industry, and government/community agencies. Students attend scheduled seminars and experience on-the-job training under actual working conditions.

 

ENGLISH & HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT

While the specific texts studied and written projects assigned may vary from teacher to teacher, the Humanities Department is dedicated to creating a comprehensive and cohesive curriculum. The Humanities courses are taught in sequence from the ninth to the twelfth grade. We have designed the sequence to provide students with the broadest possible knowledge base, which will form a strong foundation for post-secondary studies. The Humanities department also offers the opportunity to alternate the Humanities III and IV courses with the AP programs of Language and Literature. Electives such as writing, drama, and journalism are offered as well.

E27 SAT Prep — 0.5 CREDIT

E27 SAT Prep

E28 SAT Verbal/Math — 0.5 CREDIT

This course provides intensive instruction in strategies and skills essential to success on the verbal and quantitative section of the SAT. Nine weeks will be devoted to the verbal section with the remaining nine weeks devoted to the quantitative section. Students must have earned a C or better in a previous English and math course.

E50 Eng & Humanities-Step I 1 CREDIT

This course engages students in an intense study of classical mythology, two Homeric Epics-The Illiad and The Odyssey-and the Bible as literature in an effort to expose students to the literary and cultural heritage of the human experience. This course is enhanced by the study of geography, history, art, and music as they apply to human relationships. Furthermore, students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in essay writing, vocabulary development, effective sentence structure, and paragraph development. Excursions to museums, art galleries, and embassies, in addition to guest lectures, combine practical and theoretical experiences for humanities students to clarify concepts and values inherent in the literature.

E51 Eng & Humanities-Step II — 1.0 CREDIT

This course discusses the social, economical, political, and cultural forces which define the American literary and cultural heritage. Students will study American literature, history, music, and art simultaneously as they compare and contrast their experiences with those of their forebears. In additions, students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in

E52 Eng & Humanities-Step III — 1.0 CREDIT

This course includes intense exploration of the students cultural and literary heritage by exposing them to major British and multicultural writers. Additionally, students will compose a series of essays each semester, while constructing at least four independent study research papers. At the conclusion of the course, students will submit an annotated paper.

E53 Eng & Humanities-Step IV — 1.0

This course engages students in a rigorous study of multi-ethnic themes in music, art, literature, drama, science, and philosophy. Students will be encouraged to keep notebooks and will be expected to prepare short papers of three to five pages, written in and out of class. At the end of the course, students will synthesize their knowledge and conceptions in a well-documented research paper.

E64 Techniques of Writing — 0.5 CREDIT

This course provides instruction and practice in the processes and conventions of effective technical writing communication. The course uses a process approach to writing including strategies for the following:  audience analysis, prewriting, and drafting, peer sharing, revising, editing, and formatting. Other important processes discussed in this course include gathering, using, and documenting data from primary and secondary sources; adapting technical information to both technical and non-technical audiences; and recording and reporting technical information clearly and accurately. Students will produce technical reports of varying lengths and complexities that follow accepted conventions of language, style, mechanics, and format. Oral presentations on different topics based on individual occupational interests will be required. Students technical reading skills will be enhanced through the use of professional journals and trade publications.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

F04 Newcomer English — 1.0 CREDIT

Teaches English with an emphasis on the development of beginning reading and writing skills that will enable the newly-arrived non-English proficient student to function in his or her new academic and social environment.

F12 1 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE III — 1.0 CREDIT

Provides English language instruction for limited English proficient (LEP) students at an advanced level of proficiency. This class may also serve to support LEP students enrolled in an English I class.

F28 English III Support — 1.0 CREDIT

Provides support to LEP students simultaneously enrolled in an English III course. The general education and the bilingual/ESL teacher work collaboratively to ensure that the LEP students understand the skills and concepts covered in the general education course.

Humanities I (9th grade)

This course provides ninth grade students with the opportunity to explore the formative periods of civilization on several continents. Representative readings are drawn from drama, epics, historical writing, philosophy, and more. Primary focus is placed on the study of mythology and the oral tradition.

Humanities II (10th grade)

Students study the relationship of American literature to the other arts, history, religion, science, technology, and architecture of the United States from European contact to Post-Reconstruction.

Humanities III (11th grade)

This course is designed to develop knowledge and appreciation of the cultural diversity of the United States. Students will study the history, art, literature, dance, and music of a variety of ethnic groups, including Native American, African American, Irish American, Jewish American, Hispanic American, and Asian American.

Humanities IV (12th grade)

In this final year of the program, the graduating seniors will be engaged in literature, art, music, and dance which have developed during the rapidly changing social, political, and technological conditions of the twentieth century. Students will examine the impact of technology on consciousness and culture as they prepare themselves for the challenges of the 21st century.

Theatre Arts

Acting (full-year class)                           1 CREDIT

Set Design (semester class)               0.5 CREDIT

Costume Design (semester class)       0.5 CREDIT

Playwriting (semester class)               0.5 CREDIT

Y70 Senior Project — 1.0 CREDIT

The Senior Project course is a challenging student driven, teacher guided culminating program. The Senior Project course requires seniors and their instructors to agree on a project that incorporates a research paper, a product, a portfolio, and a presentation.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT

The Foreign Language Department assists students in becoming fluent in the target languages of Spanish, French, Latin and Chinese.  French I, Spanish I, Latin I and Chinese I are the first level of the two-year foreign language requirement for DCPS. While learning the language, students are exposed to different cultures thus broadening their horizons. SWW offers French, Spanish, Chinese and Latin at the high school level; however, while using the city as a classroom, our students are able to take classes at the university level.

L11 French I — 1 CREDIT

Emphasizes functional use through activities that involve meaningful language use. Mastery of sounds and intonation patterns is achieved through speaking and intensive conversation practice. Basic grammatical structures are studied and basic functional vocabulary is developed in context. Elementary passages are read for comprehension, and writing is limited basically to the construction of sentences utilizing learned grammar and vocabulary. The history and culture of Francophone countries are studied. Covers the second half of Level One course work when taken in grade 8 in middle school and all course work for level one in 9th grade in high school. Expected level of proficiency: Expected proficiency level: Novice Low to Mid. One Carnegie unit applies.

L12 French II — 1 CREDIT

Emphasizes functional use through activities that involve meaningful language use. Reinforces skills developed in French I, with emphasis on more intensive oral and listening practice of sounds and intonation. More complicated grammatical constructions are studied and vocabulary expanded through oral

discussions of topical subjects. Reading of simple literary and popular texts is introduced. More is learned about the history and customs of contemporary Francophone cultures. Expected proficiency level: Novice Mid to High.

L13 French III — 1 CREDIT

Emphasizes functional use through activities that involve meaningful language use. Learned grammatical skills and the finer points of structure are reinforced to achieve greater oral and written proficiency. Readings are drawn, primarily, from contemporary sources (novels, short stories, newspapers, magazines) for increased knowledge of Francophone cultures. The study of classics may be introduced. All instruction is in the target language. Expected level of proficiency: Intermediate Low to Mid.

L15 AP French — 1 CREDIT

Advanced Placement French Language covers the equivalent of a third-year college course in advanced French composition and conversation. It encompasses aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. The course seeks to develop language skills that are useful in themselves and that can be applied to various activities and disciplines rather than to the mastery of any specific subject matter. Extensive training in the organization and writing of compositions must be an integral part of the Advanced Placement French Language course. Students who enroll should already have a good command of French grammar and vocabulary and have competency in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, and knowledge of the language and culture of French-speaking peoples. Course is conducted in French. Expected level of proficiency: Intermediate high to Advanced.

 

L41 Latin I — 1 Credit

In Latin I students learn to read and translate simple Latin passages and recognize their basic grammatical structures. They read and manipulate passages adapted from authentic Latin literature and use spoken Latin in simple phrases and exchanges in order to practice vocabulary and Latin’s distinctive structures. Finally, in accord with School Without Walls’s humanities based design, the course continually connects Latin literature and the Greco-Roman world with Western thought, history and literature up to the present.

L42 Latin II — 1 Credit

In Latin II students read and translate adapted and original Latin passages from authentic Latin literature. In addition to expanding their Latin vocabulary, students recognize and translate Latin’s major subordinating grammatical structures. In addition, they use spoken Latin in recitation and classroom exchanges, in order to practice vocabulary and Latin’s distinctive structures. Finally, in accord with School Without Walls’s humanities-based design, the course continually connects Latin with the Western thought, history and literature up to the present.

L43 Latin III — 1 Credit

In Latin III students read, discuss, translate and analyze a wide range of authentic Latin texts both in prose and poetry in order to consolidate students’ grasp of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary; to increase their reading fluency; and to increase their appreciation of the texts’ literary and historical significance. Finally, in accord with School Without Walls’ humanities-based design, the course continually connects work in Latin with current issues, students’ own intellectual interests and the Greco-Roman world’s continuing influence on the present. This course also prepares students to enter the Latin AP course the following year.

L45 AP Latin — 1 Credit

This course covers the equivalent of a third-year college course in Latin literature. It encompasses the reading, translation and literary interpretation of large portions of Virgil’s Aeneid and Julius Caesar’s Gallic Wars. Through the literature students encounter and explore themes of war, political leadership, empire, courage, and encounters with the “other.” With coaching and practice students learn to write essays (in English) in which they analyze and discuss the themes and literary features The Aeneid and The Gallic Wars. Students who enroll must have a good command of Latin grammar and vocabulary and have successfully completed Latin III.

L61 Spanish I — 1 CREDIT

Emphasizes functional use through activities that involve meaningful language use. Mastery of Spanish sounds and intonation patterns is achieved through speaking and intensive conversation practice. Basic grammatical structures are studied and a basic functional vocabulary developed. Elementary passages are read for comprehension. Writing is basically limited to the construction of sentences utilizing grammatical structures of vocabulary learned. The history and cultures of Spain and Latin American countries are studied. Covers the second half of Level One when continued in the 8th or all of the course work for level one in 9th grade in high school. Expected level of proficiency: Novice Low -Mid. Carnegie unit applies.

L62 Spanish II — 1 CREDIT

Emphasizes functional use through activities that involve meaningful language use. Reinforces skills developed in Spanish I with emphasis on more intensive listening and speaking practice for sound and intonation. More complicated grammatical constructions are studied and vocabulary expanded through oral discussion of topical subjects A general introduction of Spanish and Latin American literature is provided, with reading of simple stories and other literary forms in Spanish. Writing is expanded to include the new structures and expanded vocabulary. The history and the contributions of Spanish-speaking peoples throughout the world are studied. Expected level of proficiency: Intermediate. Expected proficiency level: Novice Mid to High.

L63 Spanish III — 1 CREDIT

Emphasizes functional use through activities that involve meaningful language use. Reinforcement of learned grammatical skills and the learning of the finer points of structure to achieve oral and written proficiency. Readings are drawn primarily from contemporary sources (novels, short stories, newspapers, magazines). The study of classics may be introduced. All instruction is in Spanish. Expected level of proficiency: Intermediate Low to Mid.

L65 AP Spanish — 1 CREDIT

This course covers the equivalent of a third-year college course in advanced Spanish composition and conversation. It encompasses aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. The course seeks to develop language skills that are useful in themselves and that can be applied to various activities and disciplines rather than to the mastery of any specific subject matter. Extensive training in the organization and writing of compositions must be an integral part of the Advanced Placement  Spanish Language course. Students who enroll should already have a good command of Spanish grammar and vocabulary and have competency in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, and knowledge of the language and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course is conducted in Spanish. The expected level of proficiency is intermediate high to advanced.

L73 Mandarin Chinese I — 1 CREDIT

Emphasizes functional use through activities that involve meaningful language use. Stresses correct pronunciation and intonation patterns. Introduces the reading and writing of basic characters in context. Begins the study of the geographic regions, the history, and the cultures of Chin

L74 Mandarin Chinese II — 1 CREDIT

This course emphasizes functional use through activities that involve meaningful language use. All skills acquired in Level One are reinforced. Continued emphasis is placed on the Chinese system of writing. Students continue to study of the history and culture of contemporary China. Expected level of proficiency: Novice-Low through High.

L78 Chinese III — 1 CREDIT

Emphasizes functional use through activities that involve meaningful language use. Reinforcement of learned grammatical skills and the learning of the finer points of structure to achieve oral and written proficiency. Readings are drawn primarily from contemporary sources (novels, short stories, newspapers, magazines). The study of classics may be introduced. All instruction is in Chinese. Expected level of proficiency: Intermediate Low to Mid.

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT

The Mathematics Department at SWW consists of four teachers offering courses which meet not only the graduation requirements of DCPS but the diverse needs of our students: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Advanced Math, Pre-Calculus, and Calculus. For students in Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II and Advanced Math that need additional tutorial support, problem-solving (foundation) courses are offered. Students are encouraged to take a mathematics course each year. Students who take Calculus in 10th grade or 11th grade may be eligible to enroll in math classes at George Washington University. The SWW Mathematics Department makes every effort to meet the needs of our students through teacher assistance and volunteer tutoring services.

M21 Algebra 1 —1 CREDIT

Algebra I provides the opportunity for students to learn algebra as a style of thinking for formalizing patterns, functions, and generalizations. In this course, students expand previously learned quantitative rational number relationships to include the irrational numbers. The focus is on students becoming proficient in recognizing and working effectively with linear relationships and their corresponding representations in tables, graphs, and equations; such proficiency also includes competence in solving linear equations, generating equivalent expressions, using formulas, and applying proportionality. Other key algebraic topics include operations with exponents, radicals, and polynomials and rational expressions and solving systems of equations and an introduction to quadratic equations. To develop proficiency in symbolic and graphical representations, students use physical models, visual models, and technology.

While mathematical skills are addressed, teaching is focused on developing an understanding of concepts in depth, enabling students to apply the skills and make meaningful connections to life’s experiences. The use of graphing calculators is an integral part of the course.

M31 Geometry —1 CREDIT

Students in Geometry study Euclid’s postulates and theorems as the basis for an axiomatic system. Students explore geometry through inductive and deductive processes using proofs and making algebraic connections where appropriate. Topics of investigation include logic, angle and line relationships, triangles and other polygons, congruence, and similarity. Students also study coordinate geometry. Trigonometric ratios of sine, cosine, and tangent are used to solve triangle problems. Students use area, volume, geometric probability, and geometric relationships to solve real-life problems. Students use technology, constructions, and manipulatives to support their processes.

 

While mathematical skills are addressed, teaching is focused on developing an understanding of concepts in depth, enabling students to apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to life’s experiences.

 

M36 Probability & Statistics I —1 CREDIT

The emphasis during the first half of the course is on probability. Classical probability topics, including applications of the counting theory, are covered. Special topics include simulation of probability models using current technology, analysis of games of chance, reliability theory, decision theory, applications of Bayes Theorem, and distribution theory.

M41 Algebra II & Trigonometry —1 CREDIT

The study of functions is the primary focus of Algebra II. Students study functions algebraically, as well as numerically and graphically, using technology and manipulatives. The student will become proficient in recognizing and solving everyday problems that can be modeled using polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, step, and trigonometric functions. The course emphasizes the concepts of complex numbers, matrices, systems of equations and inequalities, sequences and series, probability using permutations and combinations, and trigonometry.

M46 Advanced Topics in Mathematics —1 CREDIT

 

The study of functions is the primary focus of Algebra II. Students study functions algebraically, as well as numerically and graphically, using technology and manipulatives. The student will become proficient in recognizing and solving everyday problems that can be modeled using polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, step, and trigonometric functions. The course emphasizes the concepts of complex numbers, matrices, systems of equations and inequalities, sequences and series, probability using permutations and combinations, and trigonometry.

M47 Transition to College Mathematics —1 CREDIT

 

This is a full year course for students who have completed Algebra 2, and whose background is insufficient to take Pre-Calculus. The course emphasizes the math, algebra, and geometry skills needed to succeed in a college math course.

M51 Pre-Calculus —1 CREDIT

Areas of study for the Pre-Calculus course will include exponential, power, polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and piece-wise functions, along with trigonometric functions and their inverses. Students investigate and explore mathematical ideas using methods that help them gain a deep understanding of fundamental concepts, develop multiple strategies for analyzing complex situations, and acquire appropriate technological skills. Students analyze situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically. Effective communication skills are developed so that students are able to discuss, explain, and justify their thoughts and ideas. While mathematical skills are addressed, teaching is focused on developing deep understanding of concepts that will enable students to apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to life’s experiences. The use of graphing calculators is an integral part of the course, allowing for exploration of a variety of approaches to solving problems.

M54 Concepts & Context of Calculus —1 CREDIT

This course builds on students’ experience with functions and introduces the basic concepts and skills of calculus. Students will investigate and apply the properties of polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions; broaden their understanding of the mathematics associated with rates of change; and develop facility with the concepts and skills of differential calculus as applied to polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Students will apply these skills to problem solving in a range of applications.

M61 AP Calculus AB —1 CREDIT

This is a college level class with college level expectations. Areas of study for the AP- Calculus AB course will include limits, continuity, derivatives of functions, the definite integral, and their real-world applications, products, quotients, parametric functions, the calculus of exponential and logarithmic functions, the calculus of growth and decay, algebraic calculus techniques for the elementary functions the calculus of average, extreme and vector motion. Students investigate and explore situations graphically, numerically, and symbolically. The use of graphing calculators is an integral part of the course, allowing for exploration of a variety of approaches to solving problems. A comprehensive exam will be given at the end of each semester. The student will be required to take the AP Calculus Exam in May. Participation in study group is highly recommended.

M64 AP Statistics —1 CREDIT

The purpose of Advanced Placement Statistics course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes:

  • Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns
  • Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study
  • Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.

The use of graphing calculators is an integral part of the course. Real world applications are heavily emphasized, and students are expected to actively participate in class discussions, complete projects, essays and presentations throughout the year. The student will be required to take the AP Statistics Exam in May. Participation in study group is highly recommended.

MUSIC DEPARTMENT

The Music Department provides classes for academic requirements and career direction. There are partnerships with the Washington Opera, the Choral Arts Society, the National Cathedral Choral Society, the Kennedy Center Education Department, and the Washington Performing Arts Society. The SWW choir performs in citywide programs and collaboration with the DC Music Center for instrumental instruction is currently being negotiated.

Instrumental Music Courses

U35 Orchestra —1.0 CREDIT

Provides the student with ensemble ability on orchestral instruments and development of orchestral repertoire. Skills developed include listening skills, appropriate bowing techniques, interpreting the gestures of a conductor, tuning, balance, and development of standard orchestral literature. The course focuses on repertoire expansion and involves the use of easy level music.

U62 AP Music Theory —1.0 CREDIT

Provides advanced study of music theory, composition, and harmony. Students demonstrate proficiency in their knowledge of melodic and chordal construction and progressions, scales and arpeggios (major/minor), rhythm and meter, modes, and compositional principles. Activities include: sight singing; rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic analysis and dictation; transcription; transposition; keyboard sightreading, and some study of harmony and counterpoint in the style of Johann Sebastian Bach. Students are required to complete an original composition in 18th century fugue or chorale style according to specific guidelines given by the instructor.

UA1 Applied Technique —0.5 CREDIT

Provides individual or very small group instruction on an identified instrument, including vocal. Students review: correct instrument position; correct standing and/or sitting position; identified playing positions; tuning, and identified major scales played one octave. Additional studies are included as identified by the instructor. Easy level 1 and 2 method books are used. A specific section must be specified:

A—Vocal;  B—Piano;  C—Flute;  D—Oboe;  E—Clarinet;  F—Bassoon;  G—Saxophone; H—Trumpet;  J—French Horn;  K—Trombone;  L—Tuba;  M—Euphonium;  N—Violin; P—Viola;  Q—Cello;  R–String Bass;  S—Guitar;  T—Brass;  U—Woodwind; V—Percussion; X–String

UA2 Applied Technique II —0.5 CREDIT

Continues individual or very small group instruction on an identified instrument, including vocal. Students review: correct instrument position; correct standing and/or sitting position; identified playing positions; tuning, and identified major scales played one octave. Additional studies are included as identified by the instructor. Easy level 1 and 2 method books are used. A specific section must be specified: (as above)

UD5 JAZZ BAND/ORCHESTRA I —1.0 CREDIT

Provides the opportunity for students who demonstrate good technical and improvisational talent to play music in a jazz/popular ensemble. Easy  to low intermediate level standard/original jazz and popular literature is introduced. Activities include the study of scales, chords, and various approaches are used to instill improvisational techniques. Students participate in field trips and in-house/public performances. Students may perform at the citywide jazz festival.

UD6 Jazz Band/ Orchestra II —1.0 CREDIT

Provides progression of the jazz experience in the exploration of standard and original jazz and popular literature. Students continue to enrich skills through increasing study of scales, arpeggios, chords, chord progressions and motifs. A variety of methods and practices are used to instill and enhance improvisation, technique and ensemble passages. Students participate in field trips and in -house/public performances. Students may perform at the citywide jazz festival.

UJ1G String Ensemble —1.0 CREDIT

Teaches students to play instruments at the beginning level. Students will care for and maintain instruments properly, apply techniques for good tone production, and execute correct playing posture. Students will also execute diaphragmatic breathing, interpret symbols for standard notation of music, perform the B flat concert scale and arpeggio, tune instruments to concert pitch, and perform exercises and music from beginner methods books. Students may possibly participate in the city-wide adjudicated solo and ensemble festival.

UJ1H Brass Ensemble —1.0 CREDIT

Teaches students to play instruments at the beginning level. Students will care for and maintain instruments properly, apply techniques for good tone production, and execute correct playing posture. Students will also execute diaphragmatic breathing, interpret symbols for standard notation of music, perform the B flat concert scale and arpeggio, tune instruments to concert pitch, and perform exercises and music from beginner methods books. Students may possibly participate in the city-wide adjudicated solo and ensemble festival.

UJ1T Guitar Ensemble—1.0 CREDIT

Teaches students to play instruments at the beginning level. Students will care for and maintain instruments properly, apply techniques for good tone production, and execute correct playing posture. Students will also execute diaphragmatic breathing, interpret symbols for standard notation of music, perform the B flat concert scale and arpeggio, tune instruments to concert pitch, and perform exercises and music from beginner methods books. Students may possibly participate in the city-wide adjudicated solo and ensemble festival.

UJ2 Ensemble II —1.0 CREDIT

Introduces new skills and reinforces skills learned in Ensemble I at the easy to intermediate level. Students will: perform articulations and phrasing; play and sing major scales and arpeggios; sight read music at the easy to intermediate level; perform exercises, music, and solos from intermediate methods books, and participate in the city-wide adjudicated solo and ensemble festival. A specific section must be specified: (see Applied Technique sections).

U14 From Bach to Rap —0.5 CREDIT

This course is designed to enhance and encourage the aesthetic appreciation of music in students. With emphasis on the affective elements of music, students will develop competencies in discriminatory listening, form analysis, and cross/cultural comparisons. It will begin with music from the period of Bach and continue up to the present contemporary trends, including rap music. This course may be used to satisfy graduation requirements.

U17 Music History/Literature I —0.5 CREDIT

Presents a detailed study of the historical development of music from primitive man to the late 19th century. Relationships will be made between the important stylistic characteristics of various historical periods and major musical events. The lives and works of notable musicians and composers will be identified and analyzed by the student. This course may be used to satisfy graduation requirements.

U51 Concert Choir I —1.0 CREDIT

Offers students an opportunity to acquire a fundamental choral experience. Students are trained to demonstrate correct breathing, tone quality, voice blending diction, and interpretation of music notation. Aural recognition of basic voice categories is developed and three and four part harmonies are emphasized; using appropriate choral techniques for artistic performance is stressed. Students may participate in the city-wide adjudicated choral festival.

U52 Concert Choir II —0.5 CREDIT

Provides a choral ensemble experience through which students continue to develop skills identified in the Concert Choir I course description. Through listening and performing experiences, effective techniques will be demonstrated in phrasing, dynamics, choral diction, and other aspects of choral interpretation.

UE5 Show Choir I —1.0 CREDIT

This course focuses primarily on show and jazz music with movement. The course will establish a choral performing ensemble that may sing music in any style, but the first year includes basic training in choral singing and movement. Students may participate in the adjudicated city-wide choral festival.

UG1 Computer Music Applications I —0.5 CREDIT

Explores introductory and beginning integration of music performance, improvisation, composition and notation technology applications. Students explore internet basics and the use of multimedia/MIDI software and equipment. They use such programs as Band-In-A-Box to generate rhythms in various styles, enter chord changes, control the tempo and style, and/or transpose changes to a different key. Music fundamentals are reinforced through use of software designed for learning to read, play, and interpret music.

UG2 0.5 Computer Music Applications II —0.5 CREDIT

Students explore more advanced music software, such as Finale or CuBase to enable activities in MIDI sequencing, notating/printing music through computerbase applications and digital recording. Extends skills in computer music to include technology integration in analysis and evaluation.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH

P15 Health & Phys Ed 9 —0.5 CREDIT

This course provides a multi-phased program of selected physical education instruction which will facilitate skill proficiency performance at the intermediate level or above in the area of fitness development and assessment, aerobics, gymnastics, dance, aquatics (survival elementary skills), and selected team and

individual sports/game experiences that are associated with a lifetime interest of fitness.

P26 HEALTH EDUCATION 10 —0.5 CREDIT

This course provides learning experiences related to health concepts and safety practices in the maintenance and the improvement of body efficiency, and health skills in coping with life situations, sexual behaviors that result in HIV / AIDS / other STDs and consumer concerns, environmental health, family life,

mental and emotional health injury prevention and safety, nutrition, personal health, prevention and control of disease, alcohol, drugs and tobacco, and an introduction to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills.

P27 PHYS EDUCATION 10 —0.5 CREDIT

The physical education component provides fitness plan development and assessment, intermediate-advanced skill performance in individual and dual game / sports, dance, aquatics and other lifetime sports. Theory application of game play strategies, officiating and creative student activities will be provided for selected sports.

P54 Dance Orientation —0.5 CREDIT

(This course does not meet PE or Health requirements; it may be taken as elective credit only.)

Dance orientation is designed for all entry-level 9th and 10th graders. The focus of this class is to introduce the students to several units of study material that will directly impact their status as new and continuing dance students. There will be a group project towards the end of each unit.

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

Each student has unique needs, talents, and interests; therefore, the SWW has developed innovative teaching strategies and an alternative educational environment that enhance academic, emotional, social, and physical growth. The Science Department offers Environmental Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and higher-level science courses taught on the university level. In keeping with the concept of using the city as a classroom, the department uses many sites to support the program: Gelman Library, (technology resource), Martin Luther King Library (research projects), University of D.C. (chemistry/physics labs), Natural History Museum (chemistry/biology), Museum of History & Technology (physics/chemistry), Air & Space Museum (physics), National Zoo (biology), National Aquarium (biology), Botanical Gardens (biology), GWU campus (botany).

S05 AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE —1.0 CREDIT

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

S17 Anatomy & Physiology —1.0 CREDIT

Students will build on information learned in biology and focus specifically on human anatomy and physiology. Emphasis will also be placed on healthcare careers. Through lecture, labs, and activities, students will review human anatomy and increase their knowledge of how the human body works.

S21 Biology I —1.0 CREDIT

Designed to develop and enhance students’ comprehension and appreciation of life. Focuses on evolution, reproduction and development, biotechnology and ecological relationships in the environment. Students are required.

S23 AP Biology —1.0 CREDIT

Designed to be the equivalent of freshman college biology. Students will participate in both individual and group experimental projects related to biochemistry, genetics, information coding and transfer, the origin of multi-cellularity, organismal behavior, and evolutional ecology.

S31 Chemistry I —1.0 CREDIT

Emphasizes language of chemistry, laboratory skills needed to investigate properties of matter and energy, and the application of mathematical skills to the interpretation of data. Requires laboratory investigations with proper write-ups; analysis of the relationship between matter and energy; and problem solving through interpreting the periodic chart, application of gas laws, moles, stoichiometry, preparation and properties of solutions.

S41 Physics I —1.0 CREDIT

Provides introductory description and understanding of the physical universe, from the very large (astronomical) to the very small (atom). Laws of nature are explored through hands-on activities and problem solving related to concepts in mechanics (motion, forces), wave and light, heat, electricity and magnetism, and quantum physics. Conservation principles and energy conversion from one form to another and the interrelationships between physics technology and societal concerns are integrated throughout the course.

S45 Earth Science —1.0 CREDIT

Designed to use the discovery method of learning and a hands-on, activity centered approach in the study of earth science concepts. Content areas to be included are geology, meteorology, oceanography, and space science. Field experiences are an essential component of the course.

S62 AP Physics C —1.0 CREDIT

This course ordinarily forms the first part of the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics for students majoring in the physical sciences or engineering. The sequence is more intensive and analytic than that in the B course. The subject matter of the C course is principally mechanics and electricity and magnetism, with approximately equal emphasis on these two areas. Recommended prerequisite or concurrent: calculus or AP Calculus.

S63 AP Biology Lab —1.0 CREDIT

This course is designed to be a companion course to the AP Biology course and should be taken during the same school year as the AP course. Skills such as science reasoning, experimental design, laboratory procedures and problem solving are an integral part of both courses. The Advanced Lab course allows for the additional time needed to cover all the material in an AP course and to prepare students for the College Board AP examination.

S67 AP Physics Lab —1.0 CREDIT

This course is designed to be a companion course to the AP Physics course and should be taken during the same school year as the AP course. Skills such as science reasoning, experimental design, laboratory procedures and problem solving are an integral part of both courses. The Advanced Lab course allows for the additional time needed to cover all the material in an AP course and to prepare students for the College Board AP examination. The course counts as an elective.

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT

The aim of the Social Studies Department at SWW is to help students to develop an awareness of current social and political issues as well as a sense of the interconnectedness of the world events past and present. The department offers the required courses for graduation from the District of Columbia Public School System: World Geography, DC History, World History, US History and US Government. In addition, the department offers AP US History, AP US Government, Street Law, Constitutional Law and Psychology as electives.

A67 AP Art History — 1.0 CREDIT

Prepares the student of art history for college credit while in high school. It provides a foundation for enjoying, understanding, and judging a work of art. Various learning experiences will be used including slide literature, required reading from art history texts, museum visits, class discussion, and critiques.

H 37 Community Lab I (10. 11, 12 grade), H 38 Community Lab II (Must take both H 37 and H 38)— 0.5 CREDIT EACH CLASS

The fall semester of this course provides the educational foundation for the spring semester as a peer educator for the DC Rape Crisis Center. The spring semester will consist of organizing and delivering date rape and sexual harassment presentations to high school and middle school student throughout Washington, DC.

 

This course combines historical and sociological perspectives on sexual assault as a phenomenon in American Society. Some subjects that will be addressed are:  racism and sexual assault; gender roles; facilitation skills; and sexual harassment, among others. The purpose of the class is to provide a theoretical foundation for understanding contemporary issues surrounding sexual assault. With this foundation one can provide education presentations that help individuals, particularly youth, reduce their risk of being sexually assaulted, as well as make a contribution toward ending sexual violence in our society.

 

H60 Constitutional Law — 1.0 CREDIT

Educates students about constitutional law by focusing on Supreme Court cases that involve high school students. The “We The Students” program that is utilized in this course is a Constitutional Literacy Project sponsored by the Marshall-Brenan Fellows from American University School of Law.

H71 World Problems/Contemporary Issues — 0.5

Provides an opportunity for discussion of national and international issues that have an impact on contemporary American society. Uses community resources (guest speakers, field trips, interest groups) and independent projects to develop selected issues and to present various sides of the selected issues. Paired with AP Human Geography.

HC5 1 World History and Geography (1: Mid Ages/Revolution) — 1.0 CREDIT

The 9th grade year is a study of world history and geography during the medieval and early modern eras. Students study the development and changes of complex civilizations. They identify and explore the similarities and patterns of these civilizations. Emphasis is placed on the fact that many of the civilizations developed concurrently and impacted each other. All units include an examination of the impact of religion, economics, politics, and social history on the medieval and early modern eras. The Five Themes of Geography (location, movement, region, place, and human-environmental interaction) are woven into all the units, with emphasis on how geography affected the development of these civilizations. Students will learn about related careers in history/social science.

 

HC6 World History/Geography (2: Industrial to Present) — 1.0 CREDIT

The 10th grade year is a study of world history and geography during the modern eras. Students study the development and changes of complex civilizations. This history/social science course examines the major turning points of the modern world from approximately 1750 to the present. Components of this class include: Historical Linkage, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the Rise of Imperialism and Colonialism, World War I, Totalitarianism, World War II and Nationalism. Students should develop an understanding of the historic as well as the contemporary geographic, social, political and economic consequences of the various areas and problems they review.

HC7 U.S. History/Geography: Industrial to the Present — 1.0 CREDIT

This course begins with a review of the settlement of the colonies and the American Revolution, westward expansion, the Civil War and Reconstruction. This should provide the students with a connection to their past learning. Students will then examine the major turning points in American History from the Industrial Revolution through the twentieth century. Emphasis should be placed on the expanding role of the federal government and the federal courts; the balance of power between the right of the individual and states rights; and the continuing struggle between minority rights and majority power. Importance should also be placed on the emergence of a modern corporate economy, the impact of technology on American society and culture, the movements toward equal rights for racial minorities and women, and the role of the United States as a major world power.

HC8 Principles of U.S. Government — 0.5 CREDIT

In this course, students apply knowledge gained in previous years of study to pursue a deeper understanding of the institutions of American Government. In addition, they draw on their studies of world and American history and geography and other societies to compare differences and similarities in world governmental systems today. This course is the culmination of history/social sciences classes to prepare students to solve society’s problems, to understand and to participate in the governmental process, and to be a responsible citizen of the United States and the world.

HC9 D.C. History and Government — 0.5 CREDIT

Students will examine the major events in Washington, D.C.’s history, particularly in relationship to the student’s past learning of American history. Emphasis should be placed on the creation of Washington, D.C. and the historical developments of the capital city of the United States. Topics will focus on early settlements and geography; the establishment of a new national capital and a new city; Slavery, War, and Emancipation; the Reconstruction Period; the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries; 20th-Century Expansion and Urban Challenges; Civil Rights and Home-Rule Victories; Addressing Opportunities and Problems Under Home Rule; and the District Government.

HE1 African American History — 0.5 CREDIT

Provides an in-depth, organized, systematic study of African-Americans, their history, and their culture to help students develop an understanding and an appreciation of the role played by the African-Americans in the history of America. Acquaints students with the history of African-Americans from

HG 1 Seminar in Philosophy — 0.5 CREDIT

Presents the history of ideas and thinking that shapes beliefs, attitudes and perspectives. The course will highlight contributions of the great thinkers from the Greeks to 20th century philosophers.

HG 3 Social Issues — 0.5 CREDIT

Explores, through discussion and writing, skills and techniques of non-violent living and loving, comparative culture, world religions, man’s relationship to man, and other social issues and topics. Expression through the arts and daily writing is required.

HG 4 Sociology — 0.5 CREDIT

Gives students an opportunity to study some of the important social problems of American life and determine how the problems relate to themselves and their immediate environments. Covers the elementary principles of sociology with emphasis on personal application. Concentrates on social institutions such as the family, and social trends as they relate to institutions old and new in our society. Includes a comparison of different types of societies.

HG5 Street Law — 1.0

Educates students about law which will be of use to them in their everyday lives. Begins with the study of law and the legal system and includes units on practical aspects of criminal, consumer, family, housing, and individual rights law. Student involvement is emphasized through the use of role-playing, case studies, values clarification, and mock trials and negotiations. Classroom visits from attorneys, judges, and police, along with court visits and projects in the community, are integral parts of the course.

HP 7 AP Psychology — 0.5 CREDIT

The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

HP1 AP U.S. History — 1.0 CREDIT

The AP program in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. This program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those of full-year introductory college courses. Students will learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. This course will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.

HP2 AP U.S. Government — 0.5 CREDIT

The Advanced Placement course in United States Government and Politics is designed to give students a critical perspective on politics and government. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret United States politics and an examination of the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up American politics. The course is taught with college level texts. Preparation for the A.P. test will be an integral part of the course.

HP3 AP Comparative Government — 0.5 CREDIT

The Advanced Placement course in Comparative Government and Politics is designed to give students a critical perspective on politics and government. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret and examine the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up politics and government in various parts of the world. The course is taught with college level texts. Preparation for the A.P. test will be an integral part of the course.

HP4 AP World History — 1.0 CREDIT

The AP World History course develops a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of changes in global frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. It emphasizes relevant factual knowledge, leading interpretive issues, and skills in analyzing types of historical evidence. Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms an organizing principle to address change and continuity throughout the course. Specific themes provide further organization to the course, along with consistent attention to contacts among societies that form the core of world history as a field of study.

HP5 AP Human Geography — 0.5 CREDIT

The purpose of the AP course in Human Geography is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. T he particular topics studied in an AP Human Geography course should be judged in light of the following five college-level goals that build on the National Geography Standards developed in 1994. On successful completion of the course, the student should be able to:  Use and think about maps and spatial data; Understand and interpret the implications of associations among phenomena in places; Recognize and interpret at different scales the relationships among patterns and processes; Define regions and evaluate the regionalization process; Characterize and analyze changing interconnections among places.